Defining Moments

Defining Moments

Advent

 

In the nineteenth century philosophy became something of a tongue twister at times.  According to Arthur Schopenhauer, “Man can do what he wills, but he cannot will what he wills.”  Georg Hegel believed in what he called a “system” of philosophy but maintained that reality was a historical process, examples of changes in the Spirit as a whole.  Ludwig Feuerbach believed almost the opposite of Hegel.  He believed in no spiritual realm and felt reality was, in the end, immaterial.

 

Interestingly enough, these different viewpoints formed the basis for a huge shift in political thinking and laid the groundwork for the history of the twentieth century.  A student of Hegel rejected an individualistic state of nature and believed that mankind’s life was social.  Thus, human nature was an expression of labor and activity, all done for the benefit of mankind or, in the trendy term of the period, society.  He expressed Hegel’s theories in terms of material rather than spiritual terms.  History to this student was a series of class struggles and his vision for the future was to create a classless society.  His name was Karl Marx.

 

Born to German Jewish parents who then converted to the Lutheran faith, Karl Marx believed “criticism of religion is the foundation of all criticism.”  Marx wanted to make history a science and believed that in doing so the problems of the past could be alleviated.  “The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it.” 

 

Throughout its history philosophy and religion have been together – as friends and as enemies.  Since the beginning of philosophy was man’s quest to determine what life was, what the world was, and what mankind itself was, the various creation theories and/or myths that exist had to be considered, studied, and related.  It is simply impossible to separate philosophy from belief and yet, for the most part, they seem to be at odds with each other.

 

For many, philosophy strives to explain an anguished existence in an irrational world.  For others, philosophy seeks to prove what they believe through faith.  Thus is the question for today:  Is philosophy what we believe or is what we believe contradictory to the study of philosophy?  For some, the study of philosophy is blasphemous.  For others, it is a refreshing proof of their beliefs.

 

When we try to answer that question, I ask you to consider how you show grace rather than how we live as the answer.  Philosophy is the science of thinking but life is the art of doing and what we believe is evident in what we do.  If I say I have love for my neighbor, based upon Christian beliefs, then I cannot hate those who are different.  If I say my life is dedicated to Allah, then I must live the peace the Qur’an speaks of in my daily living.  If I believe I am a child of persecuted children of Israel, how can I fail to have sympathy and empathy for others who are persecuted, even if they are of another faith?  In all of these examples and if you consider yourself to be a spiritualist, then what part does grace play?

 

Karl Marx is famous for having said “Religion is the opium of the people.”  Having absolute certainty is one’s knowledge might also be said to be addicting, even lead to the ego-driven state Marx so harshly wished mankind to avoid.  We all believe in something.  Does our manner of living and interacting with society bolster their beliefs and make them evident, defining us correctly, or do they seem at odds with our words, making a mockery of both our faith and our living?

 

In 1726, Daniel Defoe wrote in his book “The Political History of the Devil: “Things as certain as death and taxes can be more firmly believed.”  In 1789, writing to a friend in France, Benjamin Franklin wrote, in giving an update on the newly formed country and US Constitution:  “…nothing is certain except death and taxes.”  All we can be truly certain of is what we are doing.

 

There are many ways to define living and most of them do involve spiritual and/or religious beliefs.  However, what really matters is that we have tried to live as we believe.  Whatever our philosophy is, we need to make sure that it ascends to the primary core of our actions, that it is the reason behind those actions.  Then our personal philosophy will be one we support and believe.  To quote Mahatma Gandhi:  ““Your beliefs become your thoughts; your thoughts become your words; your words become your actions; your actions become your habits; your habits become your values; your values become your destiny.”  I propose to you that to whom and in what manner we show grace defines who we are.

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