From Victim to Victorious

From Victim to Victorious

Lent 16-17

 

He was born a Roman citizen to parents Conchessa and Calpurnius.  The Roman Empire extended from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic Ocean and his home was not near Rome but in the Roman British lands.  As a young teen he was kidnapped and forced into child labor by pirates.  The life was hard and unfair – the makings for a deep need to extract violence as payback and yet …

 

The Romans probably had little idea of who they were conquering when they invaded Britain and Ireland.  The Celtic and Druid culture centered on their pagan gods and goddesses and magic was an integral part of their beliefs, a magic that the Romans believed came not from good but evil.  The Romans destroyed the Celtic and Druids’ religious sites and when Christianity became the religion of the Roman Empire, many Britons converted.  

 

It was to this culture that a child named Patrick was born.  The exact location is disputed but we know he was born an aristocrat.  His family was second-generation Christians and Patrick was well educated.  One fateful day he and his father’s servants were taken prisoner and his life changed dramatically.  In an instant he went from living a life of luxury to that of servitude and despair.

 

“Blessed are the poor in spirit, for they shall inherit the kingdom.”  The first Beatitude seems contradictory and, let’s face it, a bit defeatist.  Do I have to be in dire straits to win the prize?  Certainly the millions who purchase lottery tickets might argue with that reasoning since seldom do any win.  I know of no other human living or deceased whose life portrays this Beatitude better than that of Patrick, the saint whose day is celebrated today.

 

It is said that Patrick believed “If I have any worth, it is to live my life, so as to teach these peoples, even though some of them still look down on me.”  Today his life will be celebrated worldwide with the wearing of green, symbolic of the country from which the pirates who enslaved him sailed and the country to which he returned to share his faith and spirituality.

 

Patrick wrote that he saw his escape in a dream and he did indeed escape and return to his family.  He did remain in Britain, however.  He would return to minister to the Irish and to share his creed for living.  His life remains shrouded in mystery with many things attributed to him, including the banishment of all snakes from Ireland.  What is known is that in the midst of his troubles and captivity, Patrick found solace in his beliefs and faith.  “I arise today through God’s strength to pilot me: God’s might to uphold me, God’s wisdom to guide me, God’s eye to look before me, God’s ear to hear me, God’s word to speak for me, God’s hand to guard me, God’s way to lie before me, God’s host to secure me against snares of devils, against temptations of vices, against inclinations of nature, against everyone who shall wish me ill, afar and anear, alone and in a crowd.”

 

You might argue that someone with such conviction was never truly “poor in spirit” and I would understand that interpretation. I would offer, nonetheless, that there were days in which Patrick sorely felt downtrodden and exhausted and in that, his physical spirit did indeed seem poor. 

 

He serves to represent to me a living testament of how although we might be victims of another’s cause, we alone control the effect it has on us.  The man known as Saint Patrick, in whose honor many will celebrate today with parades and parties, wanted us all to find strength in our faith and beliefs.  We truly inherit the kingdom when we live with such assurance.  We all are victims, at one time or another, of something beyond our control.  With conviction, though, we can write a life story that, like Patrick’s, will be victorious, not just for ourselves but for others. 

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