Eat It – Part Two

Eat It – Part Two

2018.07.10

Pentecost 2018

 

Dining for Women is a global giving circle dedicated to transforming lives and eradicating poverty among women and girls in the developing world. Through member education and engagement, as well as the power of collective giving, Dining for Women funds grassroots organizations that empower women and girls and promote gender equity.  Most of its members are not wealthy, donating around $35 USD, the amount they might spend dining out at a restaurant.

 

Dining for Women celebrates the power of the individual to see an injustice and act to change it; to see need and act to fill it. Dining for Women’s members are deeply involved in the grantees the organization supports and the problems they seek to address. The education component is equally as important as their fundraising.  The collective-giving model is proving that small contributions, aggregated together, can make a huge difference. This is especially true in the most impoverished areas of the world, where some subsist on less than $1.25 a day.

 

Former First Lady, US Senator, and Secretary of State Hilary Clinton stated when discussing Dining for Women:  “The efforts that Dining for Women have undertaken … all across the country over the past 13 years provide a powerful example of how individual acts of giving, when aggregated, can make a deep and transformational impact.”

 

Their website explains how the idea of eating a meal can help someone on the other side of the world become a reality.  “Dining for Women chapters meet on a regular basis – most monthly – and share a meal together. It may be in someone’s home, in a college cafeteria, an office break room, a church hall, or a local watering hole. Members share camaraderie and learn about that month’s featured grantees through videos, educational documents and presentations, and free and open discussion. Funds raised each month go to fund the featured and sustained grantees, as well as support the entire mission of Dining for Women.”

 

You see today’s woman making a difference is really a group of women, those in Dining for Women chapters all over.  By sharing a meal, they are making the world a better place for all of us.  The organization’s grant selection committee vets scores of organizations every six months, ultimately choosing 12 a year to whom grants of up to $50,000 are awarded. The process is strenuous and organizations must meet stringent selection criteria to move along in the process. Once selected, organizations must provide regular progress reports and updates as part of our monitoring and evaluation process.

 

Why do they do this?  “We don’t just give money, we invest in futures. The organizations and projects we support educate girls, teach women a skill, help develop markets for their products, and fight the prevalent gender inequality in the world. We give a hand up, not a hand out.  We fund grass-roots projects in education, healthcare, economic and environmental sustainability, safety and security, leadership and agriculture. These projects are aimed at improving the living situations for women and their families, by providing the tools they need to make changes in their lives, in their communities and in their children’s futures.”

 

Something that most of us do three times a day can become the means by which others eat, improve healthcare, create jobs and increase education.  Through their years of grant-making, Dining for Women (DFW) has done amazing work to support on-the-ground projects in more than 40 countries with 150+ grassroots organizations. This work has been guided by a simple truth: investing in women and girls can pull whole families, communities, and even countries out of extreme poverty.

 

DFW members will advocate for policies that align with our mission of empowering women and girls in the developing world and promoting gender equality. Our advocacy efforts will encompass a range of U.S. funding and legislative initiatives — from support for gender equality in the U.S. foreign aid budget, to specific policy areas such as protecting girls’ access to education, preventing violence against women, or advancing women’s role in peace and security. We also expect to support policies that make it easier for nonprofits to operate and be effective.

 

This movement is a big, non-partisan tent. DFW’s grant-making brings together people from across the political spectrum, and advocacy will do the same. The need to advocate for ending extreme poverty and ensuring gender equality transcends political affiliations.  After all, we all live together on our planet and what benefits the world ultimately benefits the individual.  Tomorrow we will conclude this three-part blog post and go back to college.  Stay tuned!

If You Love Me – Lizzie Chantree

“If You Love Me…” – Lizzie Chantree

2018.07.09

Pentecost 2018

 

Doing a series on women who have made a difference often becomes a historical exercise in biography.  Today’s featured woman, though, is alive and well and living in 21st century England.  Moreover, she qualifies for this series on several levels.  Her name is Lizzie Chantree.

 

Today is the world launch of Lizzie Chantree’s novel “If You Love Me, I’m Yours”.  I received an ARC – advanced reader’s copy – and found it to be a delightful read.  In fact, I plan to order several copies for a local book club.  Chantree’s newest novel is a great book with relatable characters.  Love’s course seldom runs smoothly and we all have our own baggage that we bring to any relationship.  This book acknowledges both of those facts in a delightful yet meaningful way without being pedantic.

 

Lizzie Chantree is an award-winning inventor and author who started her own business at the age of 18 and became one of Fair Play London and The Patent Office’s British Female Inventors of the Year in 2000.  [Her invention was a spray that stopped hosiery runs, often called ladders.]  Chantree discovered her love of writing fiction when her children were little.  Her titles include “Babe Driven”, “Love’s Child”, “Finding Gina”, “Ninja School Mum”, and today’s release with Crooked Cat Books, “If You Love Me, I’m Yours”. 

 

Chantree is a Creative Mentor and as mentioned before, an award winning inventor (BFiY), as chosen by Fair Play London and The Patent Office.  Her paintings have been exhibited and sold across the U.K.  She is also a judge of Shell LiveWIRE’s Grand Ideas Award.  Additionally, she is the host of a creative networking hour on Twitter: #creativebizhour Monday evenings 8-9pm (GMT). Her Twitter handle is @Lizzie Chantree.  Creative businesses, writers, photographers, and designers share and offer advice and support to each other.

 

When asked about the hardest thing in becoming a published writer, Chantree responded:  “The hardest thing is how much time promoting your work takes.  It’s sometimes difficult to fit in writing hours alongside marketing commitments. I am lucky that I really enjoy talking to readers, but giving author talks and having book launches makes me quake! Standing in front of people and talking about my work is not my natural environment. I’m happiest with a pen in hand and notebook on the table.”

 

Chantree considers an optimistic nature to be paramount in achieving success.  Readers of this blog will know I agree with that!  “I’m a very positive person who is full of ideas. I write books to hopefully make people smile, as I became an author after my own child was unwell for seven years and I needed a career change to be at home with her. From this dark time blossomed a completely new career, so it’s never too late to try something different. I’m also fascinated by people and love to hear about their lives and experiences.”

 

Life often throws us a curveball or two or twenty.  How we respond is the key to personal and professional success.  This is reflected in Chantree’s new book.  The characters are not perfect and how they navigate around their curveballs and imperfections makes for a delightful and satisfying story, complete with a surprise twist at the end. 

 

Chantree follows the advice she writes for her characters.  “The best piece of writing advice I was given was that you can’t edit a blank page. Get those words onto paper and you can change them later. If the page is empty, there is nowhere to go. With life in general, I would say try and be kind to yourself. Everyone gives so much of themselves to others, but if you don’t look after yourself, there will be nothing left to give.”

 

A cancer survivor herself, Lizzie Chantree lives with her family on the coast in Essex and spends her creative time in her rooftop studio. Her energy and creativity are proof that, although women often wear many hats in the 21st century, one really can live life to the fullest and share their energy with others, making the world a delightfully better place for all.  After all, if you want to love your life, you’ve got to own it.  The universe is speaking to us and echoing the title of Chantree’s new release:  “If You Love Me, I’m Yours!”

 

Preview of this book:

‘If you love me, I’m yours…’

Maud didn’t mind being boring, not really. She had a sensible job, clothes, and love life… if you counted an overbearing ex who had thanked her, rolled over and was snoring before she even realised he’d begun! She could tolerate not fulfilling her dreams, if her parents would pay her one compliment about the only thing she was passionate about in life: her art.

Dot should have fit in with her flamboyant and slightly eccentric family of talented artists, but somehow, she was an anomaly who couldn’t paint. She tried hard to be part of their world by becoming an art agent extraordinaire, but she dreamed of finding her own voice.

Dot’s brother Nate, a smoulderingly sexy and famous artist, was adored by everyone. His creative talent left them in awe of his ability to capture such passion on canvas. Women worshipped him, and even Dot’s friend Maud flushed and bumped into things when he walked into a room, but a tragic event in his past had left him emotionally and physically scarred, and reluctant to face the world again.

Someone was leaving exquisite little paintings on park benches, with a tag saying, ‘If you love me, I’m yours’. The art was so fresh and cutting-edge, that it generated a media frenzy and a scramble to discover where the mystery artist could be hiding. The revelation of who the prodigious artist was interlinked Maud, Dot and Nate’s lives forever, but their worlds came crashing down.

Were bonds of friendship, love and loyalty strong enough to withstand fame, success and scandal?

 

 

No Limits

No Limits

2018.07.06

Pentecost 2018

 

“Power, as human beings exercise power, to me means the ability to change: the ability to change oneself, the ability to change one’s community.  And the positive use of power is transformation of self and community toward a high ideal, toward a healed world.”  This quote by Katherine Jefferts Schori speaks to the topic we are exploring this month of personal power and to the needs of the world today.

 

Of Irish ancestry, Katherine Jefferts Schori was born in Pensacola to Keith Jefferts and his wife Elaine Ryan. Jefferts Schori was first raised in the Roman Catholic Church. In 1963, her parents brought her, at the age of eight, into the Episcopal Church (St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, New Providence, New Jersey) with their own move out of Roman Catholicism. Her mother converted to Eastern Orthodoxy a few years later and died in 1998.  She attended school in New Jersey, then earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Stanford University in 1974, a Master of Science degree in oceanography in 1977, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1983, also in oceanography, from Oregon State University. She is an instrument-rated pilot.  Both her parents were pilots.  She married Richard Schori, an Oregon State professor of topology, in 1979. Their daughter Katharine is a captain and pilot in the United States Air Force, continuing the family tradition.

 

Jefferts Schori earned her Master of Divinity in 1994 from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific[3] and was ordained priest that year. She served as assistant rector at the Church of the Good Samaritan, in Corvallis, Oregon, where she had special responsibility for pastoring the Hispanic community as a fluent Spanish communicator, and was in charge of adult education programs.  In 2001, Jefferts Schori was elected and consecrated Bishop of Nevada. The Church Divinity School of the Pacific gave her an honorary Doctor of Divinity in 2001. Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois awarded her an honorary degree in 2007, as did The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee the following year. (Most Episcopal seminaries award an honorary doctorate to alumni who become bishops.)

 

The Episcopal Church met in General Convention in Columbus, Ohio, in June 2006.  Bishop Jefferts Schori was elected to serve a nine-year term as Presiding Bishop by the House of Bishops, on June 18, from among seven nominees on the fifth ballot with 95 of the 188 votes cast. The House of Deputies, consisting of deacons, priests and laity, overwhelmingly approved the House of Bishops’ election later that day. She was the first woman primate in the worldwide Anglican Communion and the 26th Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church as well as the 963rd bishop of the Episcopal Church.

 

For the past thirty years, Presiding Bishops have traditionally served a fifteen year term, presiding over three General Conventions which are held every three years.  Jefferts Schori announced on September 23, 2014, that she would not seek another term as Presiding Bishop. On June 27, 2015, the General Convention elected Bishop Michael Curry of North Carolina as the 27th Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church.  In 2017, Bishop Katherine began serving as assisting bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego.

 

Diana Butler Bass, an independent scholar and expert on U.S. religion and author of eight books, including “Christianity After Religion” wrote of Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori:  “In the 21st century, with declining numbers who identify as part of mainline religion, church elections are mostly a matter of inside baseball and of no great consequence to American society. Yet this cannot be fairly said of Jefferts Schori’s tenure as the head of the Episcopal Church. In the last decade, the denomination became a sort of a laboratory in which to observe cultural and religious change.

 

“The first and most obvious fact about Jefferts Schori’s tenure is that she is a she. As the only female head of an Anglican national church, she was subjected to innumerable indignities, the most noteworthy of which was a 2010 order by Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams that she not wear a mitre (the hat worn by Christian bishops to symbolize their spiritual authority) when preaching in an English cathedral.”  [It should be noted that most recently when giving the homily at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markel, the current Presiding Bishop Michael Curry did not wear a mitre.]

 

Bass continues:  “Jefferts Schori proved a tough leader, determined to protect the church, employing her resources to quell dissent and maintain church law. As a result, the Episcopal Church lost far fewer members than had been predicted and won almost every court case brought against it.”  It should be noted that the Episcopal Church is one of the oldest religious institutions in the U.S.A.

 

The basis for the gospels included within the book known as the Holy Bible is that love has no limits.  The tenure of Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori proves, as Bass concludes, that finding such on earth is difficult.  “Jefferts Schori’s tenure also points to the complex and intertwined realities of women’s and LGBTQ rights. Her opponents exercised the same tactics of discrimination against both her and Gene Robinson. Each was (often grudgingly) recognized as a bishop, but faced constant challenges to their leadership on the basis of gender or sexual identity. They were excluded from meetings whenever possible, sometimes forced to sit separate from groups, forbidden to wear symbols of their rank in certain places, and disallowed from performing the sacraments – practices of segregation resembling those often employed against African Americans – and functionally intimating that Jefferts Schori and Robinson were somehow unclean or spiritually unacceptable.

 

“Such overt discrimination demonstrates that while sexism, homophobia and racism are not identical, they prompt the same response from those who fear losing power or privilege, including within the religious community. In a comment that applies to too many American organizations, Bishop Susan Goff of Virginia said the Episcopal Church continues to suffer from “deeply ingrained structural and institutional sexism.”  Having a woman presiding bishop does not eliminate sexism – and electing a bishop who happens to be gay does not end homophobia. The Gordian knot of equal rights for all has to be untied as a whole, not as its individual threads.”

 

As we move forward we need to see the world as “we” and not a competition between “them” and “us”.  There can be no limits to our efforts to make the world a better place for all.  To quote Bishop Katherine once said:  “See the encounters of Jesus’ life as windows into possibilities for yours.  Accept the invitation to go or strive to go through the narrow door.  Choose between life and fear, for the unengaged life is truly not worth living, and has no possibility of salvation or abundance.”

Two Notable Immigrants

Two Notable Immigrants

2018.07.04

Pentecost 2018

 

“Give me your tired, your huddled masses yearning to be free…”  Many believe this to be the beginning of an inscription when it really is the ending.  A sonnet written by Emma Lazarus to raise money to pay for the base of the Statue of Liberty, the sonnet declares the statue to be the Mother of Exiles.  This statue is as American as the flag and both the poetess and the women whom we will discuss today are shining examples of what this country has stood for throughout its history. 

 

Emma Lazarus was a Jewish poet born in New York City.  While some of her ancestors were from Germany, most came from Portugal, being some of the very first Jewish immigrants in the New World long before the American Revolution.  They came as many did seeking religious freedom and the chance to live their faith.  Her first book was published while she was in her mid-teenage years.  Lazarus was a prolific writer in her thirty-eight years on earth.  Her most notable series of articles was that entitled “An Epistle to the Hebrews” (The American Hebrew, November 10, 1882 – February 24, 1883).  It might seem as it was published more recently since in it she discussed the Jewish problems of the day, urged a technical and a Jewish education for Jews, and ranged herself among the advocates of an independent Jewish nationality and of Jewish repatriation in Palestine. 

 

Today is known in the United States of American as Independence Day, being the Fourth of July.  While the current debate centers on the right of people to emigrate, it should be noted that all humans living on the North American continent can trace their ancestry to immigrants.   Whether those known as American Indians, colonists, or refugees, everyone came from somewhere else on the globe before living here.  The settlement of this area is relatively new compared to the bones of those discovered in the Asian and European continents.  The first human settlement dates back to 9000 B.C. in Estonia and yet, science is convinced the history of man is much older.

 

Marie Jana Korbelová came to the USA at the age of eleven.  Her father was a diplomat in their native Czechoslovakia and the family settled in Denver.  At the age of twenty she became a U.S. citizen in 1957. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1959 and earned a PhD from Columbia University in 1975, writing her thesis on the Prague Spring. She worked as an aide to Senator Edmund Muskie before taking a position under Zbigniew Brzezinski on the National Security Council. She served in that position until the end of President Jimmy Carter’s lone term.

After leaving the National Security Council, Albright joined the academic staff of Georgetown University and advised Democratic candidates regarding foreign policy. After Clinton’s victory in the 1992 presidential election, she helped assemble Clinton’s National Security Council. In 1993, Clinton appointed her to the position of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. She held that position until 1997, when she succeeded Warren Christopher as Secretary of State. She served as Secretary of State until Clinton left office in 2001.

 

The first female ambassador, Madeleine Albright as Maria is now known, is a prime example of the determination many immigrants bring with them to this new home of theirs.  At the time of her birth, her father was serving as press-attaché at the Czechoslovak Embassy in Belgrade. However, the signing of the Munich Agreement in September 1938 and the disintegration of Czechoslovakia at the hands of Adolf Hitler forced the family into exile because of their links with Beneš.   In 1941, Josef and Anna had converted from Judaism to Catholicism.   Madeleine was raised in Roman Catholicism and spent the years of World War II in Great Britain, never knowing many of her family perished in the Holocaust.   

 

Madeleine Albright’s first view of the United States was the Statue of Liberty as the family landed at Ellis Island.  Requesting asylum, the family moved first to Long Island and the Colorado.  Albright is now an Episcopalian. Further example of the religious freedoms promised and cherished by the US Constitution.  Her accomplishments were not without hard work but she is a great example of what someone can do if they apply themselves, regardless of where they were born.

 

“It took me quite a long time to develop a voice, and now that I have it, I am not going to be silent.”  Those who expected the first female ambassador from the USA to be docile were very surprised with the pint size, ball of energy that is Madeleine Albright.  “We might have the right intentions, but instead of acting, we decide to wait.  We keep waiting until we run out of “untils”.  Then it is too late.” 

 

The future is ours to write and we need to embrace all of humanity in order to do so successfully.  The best celebration of any country’s Independence Day is a dedicated effort to move forward with peace and diplomacy for all.  “We have a responsibility in our time, as others have had in theirs, not to be prisoners of history but to shape history.”  These words of Madeleine Albright fit perfectly with the words of Emma Lazarus that we should extend to all a “world-wide welcome”.  It is, after all, the reason we sought to be independent.

 

 

 

Rising and Phenomenal

Rising and Phenomenal

2018.07.03

Pentecost 2018

 

She was born Marguerite Annie Johnson in St. Louis, Missouri.  She took the name of a husband who was a Greek sailor and used a form of it professionally.  She was the first black female streetcar conductor in San Francisco as well as the author of the first nonfiction bestseller by an African-American woman.  She was also the first African-American woman to have a screenplay produced for a film.  We know her as Maya Angelou.

 

This activist, author, and poet is known around the world for not only her works and soft-spoken voice but also her strength and the voice of her writings which is as strong as any ever put to paper.  Maya Angelou wrote several autobiographies and various volumes of poetry.  Her third is titled “And I Still I Rise”.  Of particular interest to us today is the poem “Still I Rise”.  While it speaks directly to the decades and even centuries of oppression of people of color, it specifically speaks to the oppression of women.  Angelou was a singer, dancer, producer, and director in addition to being a writer and, in my humble opinion, all of her experiences come together in this poem.

 

“You may write me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may tread me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sassiness upset you?

Why are you beset with gloom?

‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells

Pumping in my living room.

 

Just like moons and like suns,

With the certainty of tides,

Just like hopes springing high,

Still I’ll rise.

 

Did you want to see me broken?

Bowed head and lowered eyes?

Shoulders falling down like teardrops.

Weakened by my soulful cries.

 

Does my haughtiness offend you?

Don’t you take it awful hard

‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines

Diggin’ in my own back yard.

 

You may shoot me with your words,

You may cut me with your eyes,

You may kill me with your hatefulness,

But still, like air, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sexiness upset you?

Does it come as a surprise

That I dance like I’ve got diamonds

At the meeting of my thighs?

 

Out of the huts of history’s shame

I rise

Up from a past that’s rooted in pain

I rise

I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,

Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

I rise

Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear

I rise

Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,

I am the dream and the hope of the slave.

I rise

I rise

I rise.”

 

 

Whether we are black, yellow, brown, red, or white, male or female, Angelou’s words are a challenge and lesson to us all.  Her life and her work provide inspiration and exemplify the determination that one must have in order to succeed at anything.  We can truly be a phenomenal woman.

 

 

“Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.

I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size

But when I start to tell them,

They think I’m telling lies.

I say,

It’s in the reach of my arms

The span of my hips,

The stride of my step,

The curl of my lips.

I’m a woman

Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,

That’s me.

 

I walk into a room

Just as cool as you please,

And to a man,

The fellows stand or

Fall down on their knees.

Then they swarm around me,

A hive of honey bees.

I say,

It’s the fire in my eyes,

And the flash of my teeth,

The swing in my waist,

And the joy in my feet.

I’m a woman

Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,

That’s me.

 

Men themselves have wondered

What they see in me.

They try so much

But they can’t touch

My inner mystery.

When I try to show them

They say they still can’t see.

I say,

It’s in the arch of my back,

The sun of my smile,

The ride of my breasts,

The grace of my style.

I’m a woman

 

Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,

That’s me.

 

Now you understand

Just why my head’s not bowed.

I don’t shout or jump about

Or have to talk real loud.

When you see me passing

It ought to make you proud.

I say,

It’s in the click of my heels,

The bend of my hair,

the palm of my hand,

The need of my care,

‘Cause I’m a woman

Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,

That’s me.”

 

Seeing and Believing

Seeing and Believing

2018.7.2

Pentecost 2018

 

Recently in the city of Huntsville, Alabama, over one hundred people came together to assist in the rescue of a deaf/blind puppy who had fallen into a hole fifty feet below the earth.  The hole, thought to be the remnants of an old cistern, is located on the side of a mountain, one of the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.  The tunneling of the hole was not straight down, making the rescue very difficult.  The area to the west of the puppy’s entrapment is full of more mountains, complete with canyons and caves.  To the west about forty miles away is the home of today’s featured empowered women, Helen Keller.

 

Born on June 27th just fifteen years after the end of the War Between the States in northwest Alabama, Helen Keller contracted meningitis at the age of eighteen months.  The disease left over both blind and deaf, a condition seldom encountered by the country physicians treating her.  The Keller family had the means, however, to seek further assistance and Helen was seen by several experts in the field.  Most offered the family little hope until Helen attended the Perkins Institute and met Annie Sullivan, the teacher who would become her mentor and friend for life.

 

Helen Keller became the first deaf-blind person to earn a BA degree in the USA and went on to travel the world, speaking and living her message of inspiration.  “When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.” 

 

Helen Keller never shied away from the realities of her being but rather sought to use them as a ladder for gaining strength and abilities.  “What I’m looking for is not out there, it is in me.”  That one simple sentence is a great lesson for all of us.  Too often we seek happiness in material possessions or other people.  The reality is that happiness begins within and then spreads outward.  When we find happiness within ourselves, then we share it and it grows. 

 

Simran Khurana wrote of Keller:  “Although Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing at an early age, she lived a long and productive life as an author and activist. She was a pacifist during World War I and a socialist, an advocate for women’s rights and a member of the fledgling American Civil Liberties Union. Helen Keller traveled to 35 countries during her lifetime to support the rights of the blind.”

All too often, especially in times like these, we only see pessimism.  “Faith is the strength by which a shattered world shall emerge into the light.”  Interesting that most of us see light every day but it takes the words of a blind woman to help us truly see the light that will lead us to tomorrow and a brighter future.  “It is for us to pray not for tasks equal to our powers, but for powers equal to our tasks, to go forward with a great desire forever beating at the door of our hearts as we travel toward our distant goal.”

 

The life of Helen Keller has been written and produced into plays and movies several times over.  A simple touch of another hand was the key to unlocking the world for her.  That one fact is a testament to the power of human touch and the need we all have for relationships.  One day her teacher Annie Sullivan put Helen’s hand under a water pump and then finger spelled into her hand the word water.  By applying touch within context, Helen Keller became alive to the world around her. 

 

“Once I knew only darkness and stillness. My life was without past or future. But a little word from the fingers of another fell into my hand that clutched at emptiness and my heart leaped to the rapture of living.”  We all have something to offer another.  It is when we step out of our comfort zone and reach out that we are able to build bridges and relationships that enable us all to move forward towards better living and a brighter, empowered tomorrow.

 

Flip, Flop, Fantastic – Empowering Women

Flip, Flop, Fantastic

2018.7.1

Pentecost 2018

 

It is now July and during this month we will be discussing women, past and present, who have made a difference in their world. Some contributions are large; others are living up to their very highest potential.  Some will be named and others will remain anonymous.  They come from all walks of life and I hope you find them as inspirational and fascinating as I do.

 

Our first story is about a mother and daughter and since we in the USA are in the middle of summer, features commonly seen footwear for the summer – flip flops!  What, you might ask could someone do with these rubberized sandals?  After all, most of us scurry around in them near water.  How could two straps attached to a sole impact someone’s soul?

 

It looks like an ordinary house from the outside.  Walk into the living room, though, and you might very well see boxes of rubberized sandals known as flip flops.  The mother living there is collecting them to send to her daughter, an Air Force technician.  But surely one young woman cannot possibly need these many pairs of flip flops you might ask.  She does and happily asks for more.

 

While there is a type of electrical switch known as the “flip flop”, let me assure you that is not what this blog post is about today.  I am talking about the open-toed footwear that gets no respect for being, in spite of it having been around since 4000 BCE.  The oldest pair of flip flop sandals can be found in the British Museum and dates to 1500 BCE.  That pair is made of papyrus but the material used for these shoes has varied just as the cultures wearing them have varied.

 

Thought to have originated in ancient Egypt, the flip flop, aptly named in modern times because of the sound one makes while wearing them, was probably first made from papyrus or palm leaves.  In Africa the Masei tribe used rawhide for their sandals.  In India wood was the material of choice but China and Japan made them from straw.  As mankind advanced, so did the materials used in making flip flops and they began to be constructed from leather and other materials as well as stronger fibers that made them more lasting, durable, and wearable.

 

Servicemen returning from the Far East, especially Japan, after World War II brought back the Japanese zori and the flip flop gained popularity in the United States.  Americans added their own flair with bright colors and adornments.  The wearing of flip flops especially caught on in the surfing culture of southern California.  One company began in a garage but today makes and sells over two million pairs of flip flops each year.

 

So how can wearing flip flops become more extraordinary and less ordinary?  And why would one woman collect them to send to her daughter?  Servicemen in hospitals often do not have shower shoes or shoes that allow them to easily walk.  This Carolina mother collects the flip flops for her daughter to distribute to servicemen so that their feet are protected.  These are new flip flops donated by area people and family.

 

Recycled flip flops have a purpose, so don’t throw out your used ones.  The Flip Flop Recycling Company will happily accept them!  The FFRC is a business based in Kenya and began because a woman observed children picking flip flops out of the trash that washed on shore from the surrounding waters and ocean.  The children were making toys out of the discarded flip flops but the woman saw beyond their efforts.

 

Kenya is among the poorest nations in the world.  Throughout the world, the ocean has become a very large and often under-patrolled garbage dump.  The dumping of trash in the ocean not only endangers the wildlife living there, it also contributes to world pollution.  In Kenya, however, the FFRC is buying these flip flops from the women who collect them.  This gives the women some disposable income to help support their families.

 

Artists then use these flip flops to recycle into household products as well as other household products and art.  Some of their work has been made into fashion accessories that have been used in Parish runway fashion shows.  Other companies such as Ocean Sole are also using the trash of old discarded flip flops that end up as floating garbage to create new things and better lives.

 

Next time you go to throw out a pair of flip flops, think.  Next time you purchase a new pair, pick up a second pair for Operation Flip Flops, and then check out their Facebook page to get details on how to donate your new pair.  There is also another Facebook page called Operation Flip Flop that sent new shows/flip flops to Iraqi children.

 

Whichever charity you decide to help, and there are several in your own home town (Contact the Salvation Army, Boy and Girls Clubs, or the American Red Cross) I am certain, please do not forget that something as commonplace as a pair of flip flops can mean the world to someone else.  Make the name “flip flop” synonymous with the words “good deed” today!